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Photographing Your Pet


 


Here are examples of one photograph where the camera was too close to the dog, causing distortion, and the other where a zoom was used, and the dog was further away from the camera.


The best photographs are in natural light out-of-doors on an overcast or sunny day in early morning, late afternoon. Avoid noonday sun. Indoor photos are best by the light of a nearby window.

Never use a flash.

Always set your camera at it’s largest lens capacity or zoom in, as this prevents distortion.

Avoid very bright or very dark backgrounds.

Do not get too close to your subject. It will cause distortion. Make sure your subject is only filling 1/2-3/4 of the image.

Always take photos from the subject’s eye level, not looking down or up at them. In the case of small dogs, put them on a table.

Make sure your dog’s tongue isn’t hanging out. Exercise after the photo shoot, not before.

Take LOTS of photos.

If you want an alert expression from your dog:

The secret is to be as quiet as possible during the set-up, not letting the dog know you have the toy, so when the toy or distraction arrives, it will catch your model by surprise.

Find an assistant and a favorite dog toy. Squeakys preferred. Hide the squeaky in your pocket. No food. While you set up your camera or phone with the sun behind you, have your assistant put your dog on a leash, facing the sun planting their feet in ONE place while both of you ignore the dog. When you are ready to take a photograph, you can wait the dog out as you both stay quiet ignoring the dog and let it look around. He/she may eventually strike a pose looking at something in the area and that’s when to take a photo. Patience is a virtue. If that doesn’t work, give a high pitched squeaky noise as you click the camera and/or pull out the squeaky toy as you squeak it by your shoulder as you take your photograph. If you can’t manage that, throw it carefully in the air as you squeak it away from your dog.

 

If you want an alert expression from your horse:

Have the sun behind your back as you stand across from the horse’s shoulder. Have your assistant hold a whip/crop as they set up the horse so all legs are visible.If the horse keeps moving towards the handler, they need to back it up, not let it move forward. NO food. Set the horse up where you think there are distractions he/she may look at i.e. horses turned out nearby. Ideally slightly in front and to the horse’s side. Wait. Your model should strike the pose. If no success, which may be the case with duller horses, have a white plastic bag handy to tie to the whip and have the assistant surprise the horse by quickly lifting it high and shaking it. Once again, you are going for the element of surprise.

 

Feel free to contact me with any further questions at bethcarlson2@yahoo.com


bethcarlson2@yahoo.com



Home  |  Available Paintings
 | Sold |  Contact Beth  |  About the Artist  |  How to Purchase a Painting
E-mail Newsletter  |  Commissions  |  Commission of Your Pet  |  Photographing Your Pet